Recipe: Whole Wheat Waffles – 100 Days of Real Food


147 Reviews / 4.6 Average

These homemade whole wheat waffles are beyond easy to make for breakfast. I usually make a double batch to freeze for busy mornings knowing my kids love them.

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What’s for breakfast this weekend? How about some yummy, healthy, easy-to-make, homemade whole wheat waffles!

You do need a waffle iron for this recipe, but I definitely think it is worth the $25-30 investment for a low priced model. I’m still using my parents’ old waffle iron, which has to be at least 20 years old. It is incredibly basic and always does the trick whenever we are in the mood for some homemade waffles.

I made this exact recipe the other morning and lost count at how many my kids ate. I love that they can eat something so wholesome and still enjoy it. I did make sure they ate plenty of fruit before giving them their second and third helpings though .

If you aren’t sure what your kids will think of this for breakfast try adding a dollop of unsweetened whipped cream on top! And don’t forget to freeze the leftovers.

What goes into this recipe for whole wheat waffles?

If you haven’t already noticed from my other posts, I love making real food swaps in recipes to make them healthier. That’s why this waffle recipe uses whole wheat flour, honey (instead of sugar), and real butter!

What I really love is how easy this waffle recipe is, especially since you can use any kind of milk you have on hand. The rest of the ingredients: eggs, cinnamon, baking soda, and baking powder, are all things you probably have on hand as well!

What’s the best whole wheat flour for this homemade waffle recipe?

I especially love this recipe with whole wheat pastry flourbut you can substitute regular whole wheat flour (or white whole wheat flour) if that’s all you have. We often use King Arthur brand, but any whole wheat flour will work fine in this recipe.

How to make fluffier waffles

There’s an easy trick to getting extra fluffy waffles. Instead of adding the eggs whole, separate the whites from the yolks. Add just the egg yolks with the other liquids and leave the whites aside.

Whip the egg whites with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form, then gently fold the whites into your whole wheat waffle batter. The whipped egg whites add air into the recipe, which means extra fluffy waffles!

Waffle cooking tips

I’ve had plenty of time to perfect waffle making after making countless batches of this recipe for the kids, so here are my best tips:

  • Let the batter rest for a few minutes before cooking.
  • Make sure your waffle iron is hot at the start and between batches.
  • Instead of a ladle, you can also use a measuring cup to scoop the batter. You may need to experiment with different sizes, depending on the size of your waffle iron.
  • Don’t overfill the waffle iron. Remember your batter will expand!
  • You may need to spread the batter out in your waffle iron, especially if it’s one of those novelty shaped waffle makers.
  • Keep your waffle iron well greased, adding more butter between waffles as needed.
  • If you have kids, consider grabbing a second waffle iron or one that cooks more than one waffle at a time.
  • Waffles can be removed with something made of wood or silicone (wooden chopsticks work!). Metal tools can scratch your waffle maker. If I use metal silverware, I make sure it only touches the waffle and not the machine.

Healthy topping ideas for whole wheat waffles

We always top our waffles (and pancakes) with real food. For classic waffles, real maple syrup tastes delicious! Other yummy, sweet toppings that we’ve enjoyed are berries, peaches, homemade jamand no-sugar-added whipped cream.

For savory whole wheat waffle toppings, try Greek yogurt, butter, or natural peanut butter. Another idea is to fry an egg over easy and place it on top. (Bonus protein for a more filling breakfast!)

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