As cases surge, Uganda implements new COVID restrictions | Coronavirus pandemic news


Due to a shortage of vaccines, Uganda is one of some African countries where the number of infections has risen sharply.

Uganda is tightening its COVID lockdown measures to try to prevent a surge in a series of infections in this East African country.

The measures announced by President Yoweri Museveni on Friday night included a ban on private and public transportation within and between regions, including in the capital Kampala.

Only vehicles carrying goods and vehicles carrying sick or basic workers are allowed to operate.

“All passenger cars have been frozen,” Museveni said in a televised speech, adding that the campaign was the “cornerstone” of the recent infection outbreak.

Shops that are usually crowded in Kampala’s city centre have also been ordered to close. The ongoing night curfew will remain unchanged. The new measures will last for 42 days.

Due to a shortage of vaccines, Uganda is one of some African countries where the number of infections has risen sharply.

It has confirmed a total of 68,779 infections, including 584 deaths. The actual total data letter is much higher. Only a few thousand samples are tested every day.

Last year, Uganda took drastic measures to restrict the movement of people when there were only a few coronavirus cases. It implemented one of the earliest blockades and closures on the African continent. With the decline in the number of COVID-19 cases, this landlocked country gradually eased these restrictions.

However, severe infections have surged in recent weeks, overwhelming the fragile health system.

The doctor told AFP that as the number of daily cases in the past three weeks has increased from less than 100 to more than 1,700, oxygen and other basic medical supplies have been used up.

Although stricter restrictions were announced last week, including closing schools, bars and most gatherings.

Museveni warned that “hospitals are overcrowded,” and then added that “the rapid surge in pandemic intensity seems unprecedented, but it can still be controlled”, introducing restrictions similar to those used at the beginning of the pandemic.

Africa’s 1.3 billion people account for 18% of the world’s population, but the African continent only receives 2% of all global vaccine doses.





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About the Author: Agnes Zang